The Magazine of Ethiopian Airlines
Hotels + Hotspots

London’s Best Hotel Restaurants

British hotspots where the eating rivals the lodging.

CLAIRE MENARY / COURTESY OF NOBU

Nobu Restaurant

Nobu Hotel Shoreditch

With restaurants all over the world and a number of hotel concepts within larger resorts, Nobu Matsuhisa is one of (if not the) most widely known Japanese chefs. And now his Japanese-fusion food empire has launched its first standalone hotel, in London’s eccentric Shoreditch neighborhood. The design of the building fits the ’hood, a modernist work of glass, steel and concrete with a “deconstructed” side that inspires double takes from the street. Inside, the hotel offers 150 stylish, edgy rooms and suites, along with the real attraction: Nobu Restaurant, complete with a sushi counter, lounge area, bar and garden. Dishes include the brand’s classics (like black cod in miso) alongside Nobu-fied versions of local fare, even adding breakfast and brunch — also a Nobu first — to the menu. nobuhotelshoreditch.com



NIKOLAS KOENIG / COURTESY OF BERNERS TAVERN

Berners Tavern

The London Edition

At this central London hotspot, seemingly lauded as much for its decor as the food itself, Michelin-starred U.K. chef Jason Atherton’s cuisine celebrates the best of British game and produce. On the menu are uncomplicated classics that allow the ingredients to shine, and, around the room, wall-to-wall ornate artwork, flamboyant chandeliers, and crown molding to put Renaissance chapels to shame. (It’s an Alice in Wonderland–esque take on a traditional tavern.) Yet while the dining room might be grand, the hotel itself is far from stuffy, with 173 guest rooms featuring stripped-back, masculine decor and a bar called Punch Room that reinvents afternoon tea through a food-and-drink-pairing experience called Scandal Water. editionhotels.com/London



HESTON BLUMENTHAL / COURTESY OF BAR BOULUD

Bar Boulud • Dinner by Heston Blumenthal

Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park

At this choice hotel, truly indulgent foodies need not leave the building for their choice of not one, but two, restaurants by Michelin-starred celebrity chefs. There’s Bar Boulud by French-born, New York–famous Daniel Boulud — an upscale bistro with flavors that straddle France, America and Britain (think terrines, burgers and steaks) and prices that make sampling the top chef’s fare relatively palatable. Then there’s the real headliner: Dinner by Heston Blumenthal, a British gastronomic affair specializing in distinctive meats and upscale comfort food that’s garnered a list of awards about as long as the menu itself. Mandarin Oriental’s five-star environs aren’t too shabby, either; the hotel is an opulent display of British finery overlooking London’s iconic Hyde Park. mandarinoriental.com/London



COURTESY OF RED ROOSTER

Red Rooster

The Curtain

The Curtain, opened earlier this year in edgy East London’s Shoreditch neighborhood, is one of those hospitality concepts that can’t really be categorized. With co-working and event spaces, a rooftop pool and lounge, 120 guest rooms and suites, and the option to join its members club, the spot is primed to be both a travelers’ stopover and a locals’ destination. The common theme among these features is creativity, also on full display at Red Rooster, the quirky, colorful restaurant concept acclaimed chef Marcus Samuelsson brought across the pond from Harlem. Perfect for its new eclectic setting, the menu features Southern American favorites with traces of Samuelsson’s Swedish roots. thecurtain.com